Cash House: Celebrating the Legacy of James I. Cash

James I. Cash, James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus Welcome to Cash House, a historic building that stands as a testament to excellence and contributions. Originally constructed in 1926 as a faculty residence,...

James I. Cash, James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus James I. Cash, James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus

Welcome to Cash House, a historic building that stands as a testament to excellence and contributions. Originally constructed in 1926 as a faculty residence, Cash House has evolved over the years, transforming into a space dedicated to nurturing the leaders of tomorrow. Let's delve into the fascinating story behind this iconic structure and explore the legacy of James I. Cash, the man whom it now honors.

A Legacy of Excellence

Cash House, formerly known as Glass House, is an architectural gem created by the renowned firm McKim, Mead & White. This three-story, 7,563-square-foot stucco and brick building showcases Georgian Revival-style design. It was one of seven buildings named after influential US Secretaries of the Treasury. Today, Cash House serves as updated administrative space for the Executive Education programs at the School.

The Man Behind the Name

In 2020, Cash House received its new name to pay homage to James I. Cash, James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus. Cash's contributions and impact are nothing short of legendary. As the first Black member of the faculty to receive tenure in 1985, he blazed trails and set the standard for excellence. With degrees in Mathematics and Computer Science, Cash joined the HBS faculty in 1976 and left an indelible mark on the institution.

Throughout his storied career, Cash taught in the MBA Program and various Executive Education programs, sharing his expertise and shaping the minds of future leaders. He was not only an accomplished case writer and author but also a leading scholar in the strategic use of information technology. Cash's influence extended beyond the classroom, as he chaired the MBA Program, headed the Leadership and Learning initiative, and served as Chair of Baker Library.

After retiring in 2003, Cash's impact continued to reverberate throughout the HBS campus. His wisdom and guidance, coupled with his unwavering commitment to diversity and mentorship, shaped the School's ethos. Cash's friendship and mentorship continue to foster a sense of belonging and community at HBS.

Embracing Change for a Better Future

The decision to rename Cash House was not taken lightly. It was a reflection of HBS's commitment to inclusivity, recognizing the importance of representation and the need to celebrate individuals who epitomize outstanding character and competence. As Dean Nohria aptly stated, "Cash House will reflect our deepest belief that leaders are individuals of not just great competence but also outstanding and impeccable character."

Cash's embodiment of HBS's mission to educate leaders who make a difference in the world is a testament to his impact. Beyond his exceptional intellect and accomplishments, Cash's humility and warmth have endeared him to all who have had the privilege of knowing him. HBS takes immense pride in acknowledging his contributions, and Cash House now stands as a symbol of his remarkable legacy.

Cash House Cash House, a symbol of excellence and inclusivity

As we commemorate the renaming of Cash House, we honor James I. Cash for his remarkable achievements and the lasting imprint he has left on the HBS community. His legacy serves as an inspiration for future generations of leaders, reminding us that true greatness is achieved through both competence and character.

Let Cash House be a reminder that our spaces should reflect the diversity and values we hold dear. And let it be a call to action for all of us to make a positive impact in our own spheres of influence, just as James I. Cash has done throughout his exceptional career.

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