Embracing the Curves: 28 Projects That Showcase a Dominant Interior Design Trend for 2022

Myfresh Café / LOOP Design Studio. Image © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj In the world of interior design, there is an ongoing evolution, with architects and designers continuously experimenting with new ideas and approaches. As we...

Embracing the Curves Myfresh Café / LOOP Design Studio. Image © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

In the world of interior design, there is an ongoing evolution, with architects and designers continuously experimenting with new ideas and approaches. As we spend more time indoors, the concept of interior design has gained even more importance. One of the prominent trends that has emerged recently is the use of curved silhouettes, which adds a touch of elegance and uniqueness to spaces. What might seem like a contemporary trend actually has roots in centuries-old inspiration taken from nature's asymmetrical lines, such as those found in flowers and animals.

Embracing the Curves Embracing the Curves: 28 Projects that Highlight One of 2022’s Dominating Interior Design Trends - Image 2 of 44

Throughout history, architects have drawn inspiration from nature's organic forms. The Art Nouveau movement, for example, was characterized by the use of asymmetric lines, aesthetics, and decorative elements, along with stained glass windows and mosaics. This movement favored originality and craftsmanship, exploring the fluidity of spaces and introducing unusual volumes that contrasted with their structured surroundings.

Embracing the Curves AD Classics: Casa Milà / Antoni Gaudí. Image © Gideon Jones

But the use of curves in interior design goes beyond just a design trend. Architects and designers have realized the significance of prioritizing users’ physical, mental, and emotional well-being. By incorporating elements of biophilic design, they have created spaces that promote calmness, optimism, and playfulness. These elements, like hanging plants, natural fibers, and nature-inspired color palettes, blur the lines between man-made structures and the natural environment.

Contrary to popular belief, humans are naturally drawn to curved visual objects. A recent experiment conducted by psychologist Oshin Vartanian revealed that participants preferred curved objects over linear ones. Looking at curves taps into a primal emotional network in the brain, creating more activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region associated with emotions. Curves evoke a sense of safety and lack of threat, which is why they are favored in interior design.

Embracing the Curves DressingForFun Renewal / NTYPE. Image Courtesy of NTYPE

Culturally, contextually, and globally, curves have become a lasting design preference. Neotenic designs, characterized by voluminous bubbly furniture and playful silhouettes, are gaining popularity. Moreover, curves have been extensively used in kids' architecture as they promote a sense of safety and freedom.

Now, let's take a closer look at 28 projects that embrace the curve in their interior designs:

Walls & Partitions

  • Ulupinar Textile Headquarters Showroom / Zemberek Design Ulupinar Textile Headquarters Showroom / Zemberek Design Ulupinar Textile Headquarters Showroom / Zemberek Design. Image © Ibrahim Ozbunar

  • Sadhu Vegetarian Restaurant / Adrei Studio Sadhu Vegetarian Restaurant / Adrei Studio Sadhu Vegetarian Restaurant / Adrei Studio. Image © Trieu Chien

  • Interaction - BWM Office / feeling Design Interaction - BWM Office / feeling Design Interaction - BWM Office / feeling Design. Image © He Yuansheng

Decorative Walls

  • KOPI Jewellery Boutique / NOKE Architects KOPI Jewellery Boutique / NOKE Architects KOPI Jewellery Boutique / NOKE Architects. Image © Nate Cook; Piotr Maciaszek

  • CHEE-SE Restaurant / KSOUL Studio CHEE-SE Restaurant / KSOUL Studio CHEE-SE Restaurant / KSOUL Studio. Image © Valor Studio

  • Green Cloud House / Jiejie Studio Green Cloud House / Jiejie Studio Green Cloud House / Jiejie Studio. Image © Zhi Xia

Ceilings

  • White Cave Gallery / 123 architects White Cave Gallery / 123 architects White Cave Gallery / 123 architects. Image © Weiqi Jin

  • ISSEI Restaurant / Studio Kota ISSEI Restaurant / Studio Kota ISSEI Restaurant / Studio Kota. Image © William Sutanto

  • Jardines Lookout Flat / AFFECT-T Jardines Lookout Flat / AFFECT-T Jardines Lookout Flat / AFFECT-T. Image © Luke Hayes

Platforms & Staircases

  • B:Hive Offices / BVN + Jasmax B:Hive Offices / BVN + Jasmax B:Hive Offices / BVN + Jasmax. Image © John Gollings

  • CapitaSpring / BIG + Carlo Ratti Associati CapitaSpring / BIG + Carlo Ratti Associati CapitaSpring / BIG + Carlo Ratti Associati. Image © Finbarr Fallon

  • Je Beijing Restaurant / FUNUN LAB Je Beijing Restaurant / FUNUN LAB Je Beijing Restaurant / FUNUN LAB. Image © Ruijing Photo

Furniture & Fit-outs

  • SHOP NO. 851 / Studio Ardete SHOP NO. 851 / Studio Ardete SHOP NO. 851 / Studio Ardete. Image © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

  • Haight Clothing Store / AIA Estúdio + Raphael Tepedino Haight Clothing Store / AIA Estúdio + Raphael Tepedino Haight Clothing Store / AIA Estúdio + Raphael Tepedino. Image © Maira Acayaba

  • Canning Street House / Foomann Architects Canning Street House / Foomann Architects Canning Street House / Foomann Architects. Image © Eve Wilson

  • The Garden Pavilion / NCDA The Garden Pavilion / NCDA The Garden Pavilion / NCDA. Image © Harold De Puymorin

  • "Practice in City" KnowYourself Store / Mur Mur Lab “Practice in City” KnowYourself Store / Mur Mur Lab “Practice in City” KnowYourself Store / Mur Mur Lab. Image © WDi

Lighting

  • reMarkable Pop Up Store / Snøhetta reMarkable Pop Up Store / Snøhetta reMarkable Pop Up Store / Snøhetta. Image © Calle Huth

  • My Oh My Espresso Café / We Are Humble My Oh My Espresso Café / We Are Humble My Oh My Espresso Café / We Are Humble. Image © Peter Clarke

  • CHEE-SE Restaurant / KSOUL Studio CHEE-SE Restaurant / KSOUL Studio CHEE-SE Restaurant / KSOUL Studio. Image © Valor Studio

Decorative Elements

  • Langham Beauty / Linehouse Langham Beauty / Linehouse Langham Beauty / Linehouse. Image © HDP photography

  • Tienda Breathe / Masquespacio Tienda Breathe / Masquespacio Tienda Breathe / Masquespacio. Image © Mateo Soto

  • September Cafe / Red5studio + Ben Decor September Cafe / Red5studio + Ben Decor September Cafe / Red5studio + Ben Decor. Image © Phú Đào

Kids Architecture

  • Big and Tiny Silverlake Playground / Zooco Estudio Big and Tiny Silverlake Playground / Zooco Estudio Big and Tiny Silverlake Playground / Zooco Estudio. Image © Jim Newberry

  • NUBO Kindergarten / PAL Design NUBO Kindergarten / PAL Design NUBO Kindergarten / PAL Design. Image © Michelle Young, Amy Piddington

  • Animal Adventure Island / Fenhom·URO Animal Adventure Island / Fenhom·URO Animal Adventure Island / Fenhom·URO. Image © 404NF STUDIO

Interior Architecture & Structure

  • Shuran Wellness Space+ Shuran Skincare / E Studio Shuran Wellness Space+ Shuran Skincare / E Studio Shuran Wellness Space+ Shuran Skincare / E Studio. Image © Chao Zhang

  • V+ Lounge by the West Lake / LYCS Architecture + Studio Waffles V+ Lounge by the West Lake / LYCS Architecture + Studio Waffles V+ Lounge by the West Lake / LYCS Architecture + Studio Waffles. Image Courtesy of Studio Waffles, LYCS Architecture

  • AD Classics: Bagsværd Church / Jørn Utzon AD Classics: Bagsværd Church / Jørn Utzon AD Classics: Bagsværd Church / Jørn Utzon. Image © Flickr User: seier + seier

These projects showcase the diversity and creativity of interior design that embraces curves. From walls and partitions to decorative elements and kids' architecture, curves have become a dominant feature.

This is just a glimpse of what the world of interior design has to offer. By embracing the curves, architects and designers are creating spaces that promote well-being, enhance aesthetics, and provide a sense of safety and comfort. So, why not embrace the curves and add a touch of elegance to your own space?

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